Lyme Disease Research Database Independent reporting on all aspects of Lyme Disease

Dec 2006

O, Thank You!

Okay kids, the thing we really really need is publicity, right? Acknowledgement and assistance from the medical profession and others. Well, here's Oprah to the rescue. It's a genuine pleasure to see the first ever national ad that calls attention to this national endemic.

Please check out the powerful ad from the Turn the Corner Foundation in the November issue of Oprah magazine, and then take just a moment to e-mail a thank you note for running it. Oprah has the potential to help break this story wide open. Isn't it about time?

Here is the link to e-mail your thanks O magazine for running the ad:

http://www2.oprah.com/omagazine/omag_wehear.jhtml
Comments

PBS interview with Kathleen Zabawa

Here's something I know you're going to want to see. Watch this PBS interview presented in Houston last week (Nov 3 2006). It's excellent. Kathleen Zabawa has Lyme and really tells it like it is. She's a brave patient and an advocate for us all. One of her most important points is that Lyme needs publicity. Did you know that there are less than 100 doctors in the U.S. who are even Lyme literate?

Watch it now and then send it to your family members and friends; it will help them understand you and all the weird symptoms. It's fantastic. I'm off to send a thank you note to this woman and the host of the show. There is hope for understanding and hope for healing! We've just got a lot of work to do.

The only thing that saddens me is that it doesn't look like Kathleen has tried Samento or Cumanda, and I've interviewed Lymies who are symptom-free and healthy again because of these powerful, effective alternatives to antibiotics. I wish I could snap my fingers and get everyone with Lyme to try them. But until their doctors recommend them, people are often reluctant to try anything new. Does that make sense, though, when the doctor knows less about Lyme than you do?

Comments

On the horns of an abx dilemma.

We know that antibiotics do help Lyme patients heal, although doctors have observed that abx do their best work when people start taking them soon after becoming infected. Many docs are advocating for the use of long-term abx in the case of chronic Lyme. They feel there is no other way to deal with it. No question, antibiotics are the modern miracle medicine, an irrefutable symbol of civilization. But the medical truth is, long-term antibiotics may do more harm than good.

If you're one of those people who never experienced Lyme disease symptoms until the stress of a life-changing event set it off, you may have been given abx long after you caught the bug. Are your chances of healing from Lyme now reduced? What are the alternatives to abx, and why should we give them a chance?

Read entire article here.
Comments

300 Protest IDSA guidelines

Among the protest signs held up by attendees was a little boy's that read, "All I Want For Christmas is My Medicine."

Reporter Liz Anderson of the Journal News in Westchester, PA, covered the rally which took place on November 30:

Protesters cheered Dr. Joseph Burrascano, vice president of the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, which supports the use of long-term antibiotics in some cases and has called on the IDSA to retract the recommendations.

"If they weren't so seriously flawed, I would say it was a joke," he said of the guidelines. He urged those at the rally to fight back "by uncovering the truth."

Read the entire article here.
Comments